👨‍🏫 Which of the Following Best Describes the Operational Period Briefing?

Which of the Following Best Describes the Operational Period Briefing

Question: Which of the following best describes the Operational Period Briefing?

A. Provides an orientation to individual resources at the beginning of their assignments

B. Sets forth the specific tasks, reporting relationships, and expectations for support staff

C. Presents the Incident Action Plan (IAP) for the upcoming period to supervisory personnel

D. Helps keep the public and media informed about the incident status and operational accomplishments

Answer: Presents the Incident Action Plan (IAP) for the upcoming period to supervisory personnel

Explanation

The Incident Action Plan (IAP) is a document that outlines the objectives, strategies, and tactics for an incident.

IAPs are critical to managing incidents effectively because they provide guidance on how to respond. They also help ensure that all responders have the same understanding of what needs to be done in order to achieve success.

IAPs are produced daily and each IAP must be approved by the Incident Commander.

Operational Period Briefing provides the Incident Action Plan (IAP) for the upcoming period to supervisory personnel.

If you’re deployed to an incident, your Operational Period Briefing is an important document. It is a briefing provided at the beginning of each operational period that tells supervisors what they can expect from their team for that period.

Resources: Operational Period Briefing Activity Purpose – FEMA Training PPT

The briefing includes the Incident Action Plan (IAP), which outlines the objectives, strategies, and tactics for the upcoming operational period and also provides guidance on how to respond.

The IAPs are critical because they provide guidance on how to respond and help ensure all responders have the same understanding of what needs to be done in order to achieve success.

IAPs are produced daily and must be approved by the Incident Commander before they become active on site.

One issue with IAPs is that they can’t always keep up with the pace of an incident and may not reflect changes as they happen on site.

This means that some responders might not know about updates or changes, which could lead them down a path where their actions aren’t aligned with those of other responders.

Also Read:

  1. [Answer] Which one of the following activities is not an example of incident coordination?
  2. [Answer] Which of the Following are Core Capabilities for Response?
  3. [Answer] Which of the following correctly describes NIMS?
  4. [Answer] Which EOC configuration aligns with the on-scene incident organization?

Incident Action Planning Process

The Incident Action Planning Process (IAP) is one of the common incident management processes used in emergency response. It provides a way to organize immediate responses in the event of an emergency or disaster.

During Step 1: Assessments and Initial Immediate Actions

Responders will assess the situation before taking any action. They will find out what has happened, how many people were involved, where they are, etc.

This assessment includes getting more information about who was involved and looking for specific incidents that may have occurred. After assessing the situation, responders then take appropriate initial immediate actions; this process is done in order to prevent any further harm to people or property.

During Step 2: Planning

Responders will take steps to determine what the goal of their response is. They will also plan how they will respond to the emergency or disaster, and who will do it. This step includes developing a standard operating procedure for the scenario as well as establishing command and control procedures.

During Step 3: Execute

Responders implement plans that were made during STEP 2 (Planning). They put into practice the plans that they have already developed.

During Step 4: Monitor

Responders will review what has been done so far to determine if it was effective in reaching the goal of their response. If it is not effective, they may take additional action, or they may go back to STEP 2 (Planning) to develop more plans.

Also during STEP 4, responders will re-assess the situation, ensuring that they are still giving appropriate immediate actions and responding correctly.

Finally, after all of this is complete, responders will go back into STEP 1 (Assessment) and continue their process over again until they believe that it is no longer needed.

For example, during STEP 1, responders can use an assessment grid to determine whether or not the incident requires value type evaluation. This determines if the response requires a high level of nationally significant resources due to multiple fatalities and/or environmental consequences.

If so, it becomes critical for responders to quickly move to STEP 2 (Planning) and determine how best to respond to this type of incident.

During STEP 3 (Execute), responders will then be able to deploy appropriate resources, including medical services if needed.

And finally, during STEP 4 (Monitor), responders may use an after-action review tool such as the Key Emergency Response Management Process (KERMP) Post-Event Review (PER) tool to review how their response is going and determine what changes need to be made.

Read the full guide here: Incident Action Planning Process PDF

Incident Action Planning Guide

The Incident Action Planning Guide is a document that provides direction to responders in the early stages of an incident. The guide helps responders to organize their thoughts and develop a plan of action.

The guide also helps responders to make decisions about the appropriate level of response, and it assists with the coordination of resources.

The purpose of the Incident Action Planning Guide is to coordinate and focus response efforts from a single incident, rather than pulling together elements from different plans.

In order for responders to function efficiently during an incident, it is important that they have one integrated plan.

These 10 steps will help responders develop a coordinated course of action in a short period of time.

  1. Gather the planning team
  2. Assign roles and responsibilities
  3. Determine incident objectives
  4. Establish an initial communications plan
  5. Determine the response level, the scope of evacuation, sheltering in place, etc.
  6. Assemble a basic field supply kit for each team member
  7. Determine the initial ISD timeline and objectives
  8. Decide on a convenient meeting time and location
  9. Plan for a 60-80 minute planning session to address all 10 steps
  10. Conduct a brainstorming session with open discussion of possible courses of action, then implement the plan that best meets the objectives

This article is not intended to be a guide for responders at the scene of an emergency, but rather a guideline for incident management teams.

Responders can use this guide to develop an integrated plan of action early in the incident so they are prepared for what lies ahead.

Read the full guide here: Incident Action Planning Guide PDF

Final Words

The Operational Period Briefing is a briefing that involves the Incident Action Plan (IAP) for the upcoming period. The IAP includes all necessary information to be shared with supervisory personnel and those who need to know about it in order to carry out their duties during this time of emergency response.

With an understanding of what’s going on, they can make decisions more quickly and efficiently as well as provide timely updates back up through command channels if needed. It also allows them to ask questions or offer suggestions which will help improve future briefings by adding valuable feedback from people who are on the front lines.

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